Rag & Bone skips New York Fashion Week for a charitable photo project for Spring

For the Rag & Bone Spring 2018 collection, the brand decided to take a different approach wtapping a crew of influential and diverse personalities to showcase self-portraits. Rag & Bone requested that each subject accept payment for their time and participation in the form of donations to a charity of their choosing.

Georgia Fowler, Tali Lennox, Carolyn Murphy and Bobby Cannavale are among the people featured, and all are shown in a complete look from the spring 2018 collection.

“Coupled with everything that’s going on in the world today, it felt somewhat tone deaf to do a runway show,” Marcus Wainwright, CEO and creative director of Rag & Bone said in a statement. “Instead [we’re] doing something that we feel is more relevant, impactful and meaningful.”

The collection featured a single-button suit in hot pink. The suit is likely to be a big trend this season, and this iteration put a decidedly new spin on the tailoring Rag & Bone has been known for, thanks to its flashy color and slouchy cut. Bold color was a surprising emphasis, in general—the cheerful yellow floral slip dresses, the streaks of lipstick red, and the hits of neon came off as something of a departure for the brand. Wainwright’s sense of measure in deploying his palette was very familiar, though. The collection was grounded in its more self-effacing Rag & Bone signatures.

Wainwright seems to have found his playful side. Sometimes you detected that note in the weird, unexpectedly technical hand of a plaid overcoat; sometimes it was found in ersatz detail, such as this season’s scribble stitch added to the sides of sweatshirt sleeves or pant legs. Upon inspection, it turned out that the scribble spelled out the words Rag & Bone—logomania of a distinctively unassuming kind. The denim was the most fun, eschewing the basic silhouettes regularly stocked at the store in favor of stretch-less, vaguely mom-jeans-esque shapes given some extra punch thanks to bright washes, color-blocking, or (in one case) all-over print.